Mosherville School

The first school in Mosherville opened in 1847. It was followed by a frame schoolhouse in 1857-58 and then this schoolhouse in 1872. Built at a cost of $2800, the building originally had two rooms serving grades one through ten. As the town grew it became a an eight-grade school. The school closed in 1967 and is currently the home of the Ladies’ Aid Society.

The school is on North Street next to a church built in 1862. The church has held non-denominational services since 1947. Hope you enjoy the images from a bygone era.

The Entrance

The Entrance

Doorknob

Doorknob

Windows

Windows

Reclamation

Reclamation

Merry-Go-Round

Merry-Go-Round

Then and Now

Then and Now

Teeter-Totter and School

Teeter=Totter and School

19th Century Windows

The traditional proverb, “The eyes are the window of the soul.” (attributed to many authors), suggests that windows are for seeing in as much as for seeing out. In the 19th century windows were very important as the primary light for most tasks. Many windows (especially with glass) were a sign of wealth. Taking pictures with windows in them is a good photographic challenge; as getting the light right both inside and out can take some work. What do these windows say to you about 19th century America or even 21st century America?

Privacy Lace

Privacy Lace


Light for the Kitchen

Light for the Kitchen


Looking in at a Settler's One-Room Home.

Looking in at a Settler’s One-Room Home.


In and Out

In and Out


Farm Window

Farm Window


Cabin Window

Cabin Window


Corner Windows

Corner Windows

Out and About

Last week, Pat and I roamed the roads to Lansing to photograph in Michigan State University’s botanical gardens. When we couldn’t find any parking anywhere near the gardens, we roamed the roads back home. Here is a small sample of what we saw.

Wall Art

Wall Art


Among the Flowers

Among the Flowers


Morning Happy

Morning Happy


Window to the World

Window to the World


Windmill

Windmill

Windows Again

I am not sure what makes windows such a fascinating target for photos. Perhaps it is the reflections or maybe it is the questions windows seem to raise. In any event, here are some window shots from last week. What are your thoughts about windows?

Barn Window

Barn Window


Poorhouse Window

Poorhouse Window


Two Windows

Two Windows


Stop Window

Stop Window


Silo Window

Silo Window


Needs Paint Window

Needs Paint Window

More Windows

These additional windows are more the star of the show than those from last Friday’s post. The first is from an alley in Jackson, Michigan. It is not colorized. The whole back wall of the building – including this window – is painted blue. Likewise, the blue caboose window was found this color, in this setting. Shifting to purple, the next window is a compliment to the purple door. The final window is a second-story window in Jackson’s train station. Both the window and the reflection capture the architectural beauty of this historical landmark. Happy reflections.

blue

caboose

purple

train station

Window Dressing

“Window dressing” refers to the practice of “dressing” storefront windows or, alternatively, adding something that is superfluous or over the top. Today I am focusing [pun alert] on the former definition. In each of these four pictures, a window or part of a window brings life and energy to what would otherwise be a rather boring photo. In the first, the small portion of window sill brings life and context to the simple beauty of a cobblestone wall. While mostly invisible, the windows in the second image add depth and contrast to this museum coffee shop. In the third image, the window plays a small, but important, role in giving interest and proprotion for the viewer. The last capture uses a bit of window from a downtown bordered up store to give meaning and heightened value to its surrounds. Let a window speak to you today. More windows on Monday.

cobblestone

coffee shop

roof

red

Quirky

Those that know me, as well as those that have been following my photoblog, know that I can be quirky. In taking photographs I often look for the unusual within the usual. So today and Friday, I thought I would share some quirky photos of things that stuck my fancy. Hope at least some strike your fancy too.

Granite & Marble Swiss Church

Granite & Marble Swiss Church

Willie and Guitar

Willie and Guitar

Ticket Office

Ticket Office

Window

Window

Water Ripples

Water Ripples

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