Webs

The early morning dew seemed to linger when Pat and I went out yesterday. The sparkling dew on spider webs radiated like diamonds on a crown. The intricacies of these master builders of silk in their beautifully alluring traps made me think of the line from Sir Walter Scot: “O what a tangled web we weave when first we practise to deceive.” Maybe he had in mind the deception of the beauty in these often hidden gems . . . at least deceptive to insects. A few more tomorrow.

Arc

Arc


Bowl

Bowl


Circle

Circle


Jeweled Cross

Jeweled Cross


Square

Square


Star

Star


Frog and Webs

Frog and Webs

Bugs and Spiders of Summer

When shooting flowers (yesterday’s post), I often encounter bugs and spiders along the way. They can add interest to a flower picture (like the first three images below) or they can become the star (as in the last two pictures). The vibrant spider was hanging and climbing near a flower box on our deck. Today, the captions tell the story.

One Bug

One Bug


Two Bugs

Two Bugs


Three Bugs

Three Bugs


Hanging by a Thread

Hanging by a Thread


Thinking Big

Thinking Big

Web Masters

“Oh what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive!” The quote from Sir Walter Scott aptly uses the spider web as a metaphor for deception. Spider webs deceive by blending in easily with the background, which is why we sometimes get a face full (and why they can be difficult to photograph). Or they all can deceive by being very visible, attracting visitors. Her are some unoccupied webs and one with a no vacancy sign.

web over water

webs w red

webs and bolt

spider

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