Lightroom

For my digital editing I use Lightroom 5. It is an Adobe product designed for photo editing (unlike the more expensive Photoshop which is designed more for graphic design). I rarely do more than very mild adjustments. Even in strong adjustments, I probably don’t use more than 50% of Lightroom’s capabilities. I thought you might be interested in seeing some of what can be done with digital photos.

Photo as shot

Photo as shot


The camera uses a 3 x 4 format which will not be best for every photo. I did not crop the final version of this photo, but infinite cropping can be done.
Cropped photo

Cropped photo


You can make your color photo a black and white picture with one click.
In black and white

In black and white


Easily adjust the black and white tones.
Adjusted black and white

Adjusted black and white


You can leave just some color in the picture.
done
You can also do vignetting in all sizes (which I personally think is over-the-top for this picture).
With vignetting

With vignetting

Rust

Much like my previous post on barnwood, I also find a beauty in the aging process of metal. These images are from outside of the Beach Bar, a local hangout for nearly 70 years. For me, the blending of oranges, reds, and purples that make up rust become an abstract work of art unlike anything man can make. Enjoy rust.

Anchor and Chain

Anchor and Chain


Chain and Stone

Chain and Stone


Chain

Chain

Fasteners

These photos of various fasteners come from a one-day shoot last week. For people, buttons, zippers, and Velcro are important. For buildings it is more about cement, bolts, welds, and nails. The images below look at some rather beautiful fasteners. I welcome your thoughts, critiques, and musings.

Bolt and Mortar

Bolt and Mortar


Bolt and Wood

Bolt and Wood


Gutter Fasteners

Gutter Fasteners


Nailhead

Nailhead


Nailbottom

Nailbottom


Nail Bottom Up

Nail Bottom Up


Ring, Clip, & Rope

Ring, Clip, & Rope

Rust

The word “rust” usually brings to mind images of corrosion, decay, and demise. All true, but in all that there is a beauty of purples, oranges, and reds that seems to catch my eye. All these images are from an old storage and loading building for train transport. Captions tell a little bit of this rusty story. As always your thoughts, critiques, and responses are invited.

Bolt in Brick

Bolt in Brick


Bolt in Wood

Bolt in Wood


Bracket and Nail

Bracket and Nail


Utility Foothold

Utility Foothold


Skybeam

Skybeam


Twisted Metal

Twisted Metal


Aged Sign

Aged Sign

Rust, Rot, & Decay

Despite the rather gloomy title, I find a real beauty in these reminders from nature of the transient reality of everything . . . whether created or man made. The chemical oxidation of metal produces rust that is often rich with reds and oranges as in the railing on a footbridge and the extra character added to a mailbox.

Footbridge Railing

Footbridge Railing


Mailbox

Mailbox


The rotting wood from a fallen log was captured in a Georgia swamp. The visible beauty of the rot comes from the rich texture and a rainbow full of colors. The invisible beauty is that in the demise of this tree nutrients are added to the soil and mushrooms and insects are well fed along with nearby trees and vines.
Rotting Tree

Rotting Tree


The last two images are more about decay than rust or rot. The first image is a small portion of a large demolition project on a former hotel. This reminder of the “this too shall pass” nature of human craft and construction is also visible in our crumbling infrastructure, yet we still tend to imagine a permanence that isn’t there. The last rose of summer was nipped by a killing frost. This rose will decay, but will be forgotten with the new roses of next summer.
Demolition

Demolition


Summer's Last Rose.

Summer’s Last Rose.


As I age, I am increasingly aware of my body’s own versions of rust, rot, and decay. At the same time I have become aware of the intrinsic internal beauty of aging and have learned to focus on the new roses of summer and not too much on the rust, rot, and decay.

Roundhouse

In boxing a roundhouse is a big punch. Jackson’s former economic big punch was its railroads. There is a good article about Jackson’s rail history (with pictures) by my friend Ken Wyatt at
http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2012/06/peek_through_time_central_
Add rail.html to the above link. Word press doesn’t like long URLs.

Pat and I went with the intention of trying to see if anything remained of the Jackson roundhouse where her grandfather had worked. We were able to find some remains of the roundhouse; the circular foundation and tracks leading out. To our delight we also were able to see much more. The surrounding warehouses are still in use (mostly by trucking companies) and many of the tracks still haul freight. There was an intrinsic beauty in both the history of the ground we walked on as well as the beauty that remains in the aging infrastructure. These are just a few of yesterday’s shots; more later (Do notice the windshield wipers on the side window of the blue caboose!)

Caboose Window

Caboose Window

Changing Tracks

Changing Tracks

Tied In

Tied In

Spikes (from a large pile)

Spikes (from a large pile)

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