Roundhouse

In boxing a roundhouse is a big punch. Jackson’s former economic big punch was its railroads. There is a good article about Jackson’s rail history (with pictures) by my friend Ken Wyatt at
http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2012/06/peek_through_time_central_
Add rail.html to the above link. Word press doesn’t like long URLs.

Pat and I went with the intention of trying to see if anything remained of the Jackson roundhouse where her grandfather had worked. We were able to find some remains of the roundhouse; the circular foundation and tracks leading out. To our delight we also were able to see much more. The surrounding warehouses are still in use (mostly by trucking companies) and many of the tracks still haul freight. There was an intrinsic beauty in both the history of the ground we walked on as well as the beauty that remains in the aging infrastructure. These are just a few of yesterday’s shots; more later (Do notice the windshield wipers on the side window of the blue caboose!)

Caboose Window

Caboose Window

Changing Tracks

Changing Tracks

Tied In

Tied In

Spikes (from a large pile)

Spikes (from a large pile)

Stained Glass

For our recent photo excursion Pat and I visited five historic, downtown Jackson Michigan churches. We took pics of the gardens, exteriors, doors, and spires but we also received permission from each church to enter the church and take pictures inside. I love stained glass windows and focused (sorry about the pun) on them

Colored or stained glass goes way back into ancient times, but it wasn’t until the late fourth century that some churches had a stained-glass type of window. The ornate stained glass windows we associate with churches first appeared in Britain in the 7th century. For more on stained glass see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stained_glass .
round windowBibleJesus contemporary The three samples I am sharing are from three different churches (Catholic, Baptist, and Lutheran). To me, each has a different kind of beauty. In taking the pictures I metered on the windows to accentuate the light coming through the windows. The pictures were taken without flash. As always I am interested in your thoughts and comments.

Jackson Train Station

The Jackson, Michigan train station is one of the oldest continually operating stations in the country. It opened in September 1873 and is listed in the National Register of Historic places. Presidents Taft, Eisenhower, Kennedy and Nixon all stopped here. The station has gone through a number of restorations to maintain its classic beauty.  The train station photo was shot in very early morning light with the lens at 300 mm and f/25. The ticket office window was shot at 72 mm and f/22. Traveling by train is a slow way to travel, but can allow more time to take in the passing countryside towns, and cities. Often I think the slower pace of yesteryear has a lot of advantages, but then I am rushed back to the frazzle of the day.

 

Train Station

 

Ticket Office

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