Haunted House?

Haunted? Probably not. It’s more likely the beginning of settlement on this farm property.
I rarely talk about my shooting process, but here goes. I typically address three questions; sometimes mulling them over and sometimes almost instantly. The questions are 1.) Why does this shot appeal to me?; 2.) Is this the best angle to capture the image?; and 3.) How can I best convey the emotional response this subject raises in me? I have been influenced in these questions by Freeman Patterson (whose work I love!) and Ansel Adams (who still often inspires me, though dead, to consider black-and-white photos).
Here’s how I answered the questions. One. I love the mystical image of the fog, mist, and old wood contrasted with the reflection of the morning sun off of the window. Two. After moving around a bit, I settled on this shot because the light reflected best off of the window, the road draws your eyes to the cabin, and the trees frame the shot. Three. Getting a darker picture with the fog still prominent and the light just starting to break through came as close as I could come to conveying my emotional response.
In processing I preferred the starkness of the black-and-white photo (all I used to shoot), but included the color image for comparison.
Which image connects best with you?

House in Black-and-White

House in Black-and-White


House in Early Morning Color

House in Early Morning Color

A Victorian Lady

I love Victorian houses. While the Victorian period is typically listed as mid 19th century to 1900, most Victorian houses still standing in the United States were built toward the latter half of that period.

While driving down a country road near me, I came across a sadly rundown Victorian house that still presented herself with hints of her former beauty. The house has three porches that all appear to be original. One porch is on the northwest corner of the house, one on the southwest corner of the house, and one facing south. I took other pictures, but these are all from the porches.

The first three pictures are of the front porch. Note the two doors to the porch. The next picture is of the front porch railing and the third picture is from the wood detail under the porch (probably intended to keep animals out).
front porchporch railingporch under

The fourth picture is from the corner of the south-facing porch. And the last picture is a black-and-white image of the detail in one of the northwest porch posts. If the porches are still sound, any one of them would be a great place to sip a cool beverage on a hot day.

porch cornerdetail b&w
detail b&w

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