Black Swan and Fall Sun

The Australian Black Swan was once found only around Australia. Importation and some resultant escapes have made the black swan present in very small numbers in Europe and North America as well as Asia. I have included two shots of the swan and one additional image, The additional image was from my panning of the flight of two swans and catching a bit of sun. Some would immediately delete such images, but I rather enjoy the slight abstraction and hope you do as well.

On Land

On Land

In the Water

In the Water

Fall Sun

Fall Sun

Grand Rapids Public Museum

Last Monday I went with my two oldest sons, their wives, and their kids (three of my five grandkids) to the Grand Rapids Public Museum (http://www.grmuseum.org/). The museum is an eclectic mix of antiques, natural history, and science. As I often try to do, I looked for the unusual in the midst of the usual.

The first image is of a large clock that hangs from the top of the three-story main hall.
Clock

In the same entrance hall I focused on a headlight from an old car.
headlight

This antique table was part of a furniture making exhibit; one of Grand Rapid’s early industries.
Table

The last two photos are more abstract. I tried to capture the lines and angles that are so much a part of this museum that sits right on the Grand River. (It even has a working carousel that is cantilevered over the river!) While both images include a blue bridge, a very large wheel from a restored generator from a table factory frames the last image. The titles sum up the images fairly well.

Window, River, and Bridge

Window, River, and Bridge

Wheel, Stairs, Bridge, and Building

Wheel, Stairs, Bridge, and Building

Your thoughts and comments are always welcome.

Zoo Abstractions

If we think of photography as a continuum, with documentary photography (capturing the event, object, story) on one end and interpretative photography (portraying the feeling, essence, emotive qualities) on the other end, most photography falls somewhere between the two poles. That said, photographers often show a preference – slight or strong – for one of these two approaches to photography.

For me, art is all about reaching head and heart. In my photography I try to capture enough of the subject to set a context but also try to provide an emotive element. Today’s somewhat abstract images from the zoo lean much more toward the interpretative end of the continuum.

In the first two images I attempted to portray the intrinsic beauty of the peacock through rather abstract (interpretive) images of the bird’s feathers. The third image is about the colorful beauty of the rotting process in a fallen tree. The last image is of eyelashes from an African cow. The interpretation comes in capturing the swirls and the shadows in this tight shot.

Tail Feathers

Tail Feathers

Side Feathers

Side Feathers

Rotting Log

Rotting Log

Beauty is in the eye . . .

“Beauty is in the eye . . .”

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